Tag Archives: easter

Do you really know God? Titus 2:11-15, Part 2

30 Jul
Photo by Federico Vespini on Unsplash

As we continue studying Titus 2:11-15, Paul says that salvation has appeared to all.  “Appeared” is the Greek word where we get our English word, “epiphany.”  Epiphany gives us the idea of light appearing in the darkness, like at sunrise.  Here “epiphany” refers to God’s grace like a new light of truth in Christ appearing in the darkness.

This reminds me of the story of the first Easter morning. Jesus had been dead for Friday, Saturday, and now into Sunday, and his followers are distraught.  Do you remember that moment where Mary from Magdalene is in the garden where Jesus’ tomb was located, and she discovers that the tomb is empty, and assumes that someone must have taken the body?  She wanders in the garden, confused, bumping into a man whom she thinks is the gardener.  Through tears, she asks him where the body of Jesus is.  And the gardener simply says one word, her name, “Mary.”  At that moment Mary has an understanding.  An epiphany.  It was not the gardener who stood before her, but it was Jesus. 

Now back in Titus, Paul is saying that salvation is revealed to all.  How has the grace of God that brings salvation appeared to all men?  The word “to” can also be translated “for”.  Either works.  It is salvation for all and to all. Paul is not saying that all are automatically saved.  Instead he saying that the scope of salvation is that it is revealed to all. 

So before we continue, let me ask a question: do you know that God wants to be in a relationship with you?  His grace has appeared.  He has initiated it.  He has done it.  He is reaching out.  He really wants to know you and be known by you.  Do you know him?  Do the people in your family really know him?  How about your neighbors?  Friends? 

When I think about really knowing him, I go back to our Faith Church Logo and that vertical black line in the middle of the four squares.   We call that the Matthew 7 line because of the short parable Jesus tells in Matthew 7:21-23. He describes people who thought for sure they were going to enter Jesus’ Kingdom, but he shocks them saying, “Depart from, I never knew you.”  Do you really know him?  Or do you think you know him, but he would say, “I never knew you.”  And how do you know if you know him?

As we continue walking through this passage in these series of posts on Titus 2:11-15, we’ll see how Paul answers these questions. For now, think about the questions I’ve asked. How would you answer them? Have you experienced the epiphany, the revealing of God’s grace in your life?

How to access God’s power for your life

18 Apr

Image result for the power of godDon’t you hate it when the batteries are dead?  I pull out my cordless drill to work on something, and there is no power.  Thankfully, my drill came with a second battery, so I swap them out, and I find that they second one is dead too.

Ever dealt with that? So frustrating, right?  Powerlessness.

Power tools or other gadgets are one thing.  You can buy new batteries, or charge the ones you’ve got.  It just requires a little wait or money.

But when you are dealing with power for life, that’s another story.

What do you do if you are trying to kick a bad habit, and you feel like you have no power?  What about fixing a broken relationship?

What about dealing with a difficult health problem or job loss or lots of bills?

Have you ever been in a situation where you felt powerless?

Sometimes in life we feel totally powerless about the situations we get into.  And that is not a fun feeling.  We hate it!  I hate it.

In Ephesians 1:15-20, Paul talks about power that is available in those difficult situations.  Paul prays that they may know, in verse 19, “[God’s] incomparably great power, for us who believe; that power is like the working of his mighty strength which he exerted in Christ when he raised him from the dead.”

This reality is ours.  You can know God’s resurrection power at work in your life now!  What an amazing promise.

And yet some of you hear that, and it sounds so far-fetched, so unbelievable. How do you feel about that?

On Easter Sunday I have found that while we often look backward in thanks and joy remembering Jesus’ victory over death, and while we look forward to the day when we will experience that resurrection ourselves and be with him, we often neglect to think about the implications of the resurrection right now. Does the resurrection matter today?

Paul is saying that we can experience that resurrection power in our lives right now.  He is not talking about some distant future.  As followers of Jesus, we should expect that working of his mighty power in our lives right now.

Evaluate your own life.  Have you become defeated?  Have you forgotten that his power is available to you now?

That power that God wielded to raise Jesus from the dead is available to us!  Or as another translation puts it “how tremendous is the power available to us who believe in God.”  New life is available to us now.  Power for victory over our on sin.  Power to be changed.

But you might be thinking “wait a minute…I have been asking for that power to be at work in my life for 20 years, and I feel like I haven’t seen it.”  Or “I have been praying for a loved one to experience that power, or for that power to heal a broken relationship…and I have been praying for a long time, and I haven’t seen it!  What gives?”  Know that many people feel this way.

Some things to remember:

  1. We are in a battle with an enemy who has not given up.
  2. We have free will, and God rarely, extremely rarely overrules us.
  3. We might have a misconception about our part in the process. Paul is not saying here that we need to just do nothing and wait for God to rain down his power in us.   We have a responsibility.

Know that God is alive and well, and his resurrection power is at work changing lives.

A couple weeks ago at Family Night, a former Faith Church member shared the heart-wrenching story of her husband’s arrest, conviction and incarceration for child pornography.  She also shared how the power of God has been very evident in their family’s life, and especially in her husband’s life, as during his 20 month-long house arrest he started following Christ.  He lost his job, they had to declare bankruptcy, and their neighborhood rejected them because of his sinful choices.  Through this, God’s transforming power was at work, and her husband, though he is in prison, is a changed man, and is even ministering to other inmates in prison.

Those of us here for the CV Community Good Friday worship service heard the amazing story of how one of the top gang leaders in Lancaster City came to Christ.  He went to a presentation at Clipper Stadium where Nicky Cruz spoke.  Cruz was a big time gang leader in New York City whose life was transformed by Jesus, and has been sharing the story of the power of God for decades.  So this Lancaster City gang leader was listening to Cruz.  He didn’t respond to Cruz’s sermon, to the invitation or to the prayer.  But as he walked out of the stadium into the parking lot, he broke down and gave his life to Christ.  Since that time, he has now led 13 of his gang members to Christ!

On Thursday night at our Maundy Thursday Passover Seder, a Jewish Christian shared his story.  He grew up in a Jewish household, and though he heard about Jesus, he never read the New Testament.  He was always taught that Christians were violent cult members.  Later in life he started reading the New Testament, and he was absolutely astounded at what he read.  He learned about a thoroughly Jewish man that was truly the Messiah, the Savior, the Promised One, and this Jewish man gave his life to Christ.

God’s power is at work in so many ways!

And that power is available to us.  If you have a problem with complaining, God’s power is available to you.  If you have lustful thoughts, God’s power is available to you.  If you have anger issues, God’s power is available to you.  That same power that raised Jesus from the dead is available to you to transform your life now.

But what about the people who are Christians who feel distant from God?  What if they are thinking “I wish I could experience some of God’s power in my life! But I don’t feel like I do.”

We need to first of all realize that his amazing power is available to us!  That alone might be a new concept for you.  God is not distant. His power is available to us.

Second, we should ask him for his power.  That’s what Paul is doing in this prayer in Ephesians 1.  Paul is praying that those Christians in the Roman city of Ephesus would know God’s power like never before. Start asking God to give you his power to transform you life.

The hard part of this is that some of us are not experiencing this amazing manifestation of power, and we wonder if something is wrong with us.

“Where is this power you are promising, God?”

God can and does manifest himself in radical ways.  But his incredible power is also available and flowing to us in many ways, sometimes quiet ways, sometimes in ways that don’t seem like power.

It should be seen as a partnership.

I have heard people say “God took away my desire for cigarettes” and it was miraculous.  But more often than not, it will be hard work.  God empowering us to work hard, to be creative, diligent, determined.

Should we think “God will supply food for my family while I do nothing.”?  No, most often God’s power will enable you to get out there and work.

I am an adjunct professor for Lancaster Bible College.  I teach online course.  Back in the fall, I was looking ahead to the winter/spring, and I hadn’t heard anything from the college about teaching.  So I contacted them, and asked if they needed me to teach. The one course I teach is for adult learners who are going back to school later in life to finish off an uncompleted bachelor’s degree.  That course has been on a standard schedule, and they responded that would continue as normal.  But I also teach regular semester courses in the traditional undergrad program.  I asked about that, and they told there were none.

Two weeks later, surprise, my name was on the list for one of those regular semester courses.  I thought Okay, great!  That extra income would be a wonderful help.  Then two weeks after that, I got an email from the guy who originally told me there were none available, and this time he offered me to teach another course!

I had to ask, I had to work, but clearly it was God who provided.  And what amazing is that this winter/spring we needed extra income to be able to go visit our son who graduated from Army boot camp in Oklahoma.

God’s power is available for the powerless. Remind yourself that God’s resurrection power is available to you.  Believe it. Ask for it.  And then strive for it.

He is risen? Really? So what?

3 Jun

“He is risen!  He is risen indeed!”

This is the call and response that we use on Easter Sunday.  But this Sunday is not Easter Sunday.  That was two months ago.  This Sunday we’re revisiting Easter again.  Why?

In the book of Acts we learn that the earliest Christians decided to meet on Sundays because Jesus’ resurrection happened on a Sunday.  Think about that.  Many cultures around the world reserve Sundays as a day off for rest and worship because nearly 2000 years ago a small group of Jesus’ followers wanted to give time every week to commemorate his resurrection.

It didn’t start off that way.  In fact those Christians were all Jews.  They lived in a culture, in the nation Israel, where Saturday was the day off for worship.  Sunday was just another workday, the first day of the work week.   So these Christians had to deal with the ramifications of their decision to worship on a day when everyone else would be working.

Did they only meet in the evening after work was done?

Or did they worship in the morning or afternoon, and thus have to say to their employers, “Sorry, but we are no longer working on Sunday mornings or afternoons,” and face the consequences?

It would have been much easier for them to worship on the Sabbath like everyone else did.  The Jewish worship day, called Sabbath, was Friday sundown to Saturday sundown.  It would have been super easy for the Christians to just worship on the Sabbath, but they chose something else.  They chose to worship on Sundays because that was the day of the week Jesus rose from the dead.

That’s why we worship on Sundays too.  But that’s not why we’re talking about the resurrection this coming Sunday. So why are we talking about it?

Maybe you’re wondering if it is because this coming Sunday will be one of our two summertime Sundays of worshiping in the park, and we wanted to focus on something special.  Nice thought, but nope, that’s not the reason either.

I have a much more mundane reason why we’re talking about Jesus rising from the dead.

You know why?  It’s what comes next.

We have been studying the life of Jesus as told to us by a guy named Luke who was one of the first missionaries.  Luke tells us right at the beginning that he did the work of a journalist and historian, trying to tell the story of Jesus’ life.  So since the last Sunday of November 2014 we have been learning about the words, works and way of Jesus.  All he taught and all he did.  So that we might learn to know him better and follow him.

Now we have come to the pinnacle moment in his life.  On this, the 70th sermon of the series, we travel back to the first Resurrection Day.  As much as we can.

But on that day, when the first disciples heard those words “He is risen!” their response was a bit different.  They didn’t say “He is risen indeed!” as we do with excitement and hope and thankfulness.  Instead, they likely asked it as a question: “He is risen?  What are you talking about?”

Good question, disciples.  What is this resurrection thing all about?  Why does it matter?  Even if we believe that it happened 2000 years ago, how does that ancient history affect us now, if at all?

Join us at East Lampeter Community Park on Hobson Road at 10am to learn more!

Saying No to invitations

24 Mar

I’ve been invited to a bunch of banquets lately, and interestingly enough they are all great, and they are all on the same weekend, April 21-23.  It is unique that they all ended up at around the same time, but it is not unique to get invited to banquets.  Have you noticed that there are lots of banquets these days.  Maybe you have been invited to them too.  The ones I’m invited to tend to be fundraising banquets.  The organizers bring in a special speaker, or a music group, have a silent auction, live auction, etc., and they give you an update about their charity or ministry, then raise money.  The cool thing is that not only do you get a really good meal, but you hear about so many good causes, and you get a chance to support them!  I love a good banquet, but I can’t say yes to them all.  Frankly, I’m just too busy.

Because I can’t go to this group of banquets coming up, let me invite you to consider them!

First there is the Wenger Foundation Praise Dinner, on April 21, a banquet that raises money for a number of local charities, including Evangelical Seminary, of which I am an alumnus.  The cost of this banquet is $125.  This banquet supports great causes, and Evangelical has amazing educational programs for all kinds of people, but at $125 a plate, I’m not going to be able to swing it.  The invite says the cost of the banquet is entirely underwritten, so all of the $125 goes to the charities.  That’s great, but we’re busy that night…believe it or not, because we’re going to another banquet!  To hear about that other banquet, I invite you to join us for Easter worship on Sunday at Faith Church.

The very next night, April 22, Michelle and I have been invited to the Center for Parent/Youth Understanding annual celebration banquet at Shady Maple.  Michelle and I have gone to that one numerous times, and some of you have joined us.  It is always really great.  Not only do you get a wonderful Shady Maple meal, it is free!  Again, the banquet costs are completely underwritten so how does CPYU raise money that night?  They have tons of silent auction items, and a live auction, and it is fun!   Like the praise dinner, I’m busy and can’t make the CPYU banquet.  If you want to go, you’ll hear an awesome presentation about CPYU’s important ministry to teenagers, parents and youth workers.

Believe it or not, that very same weekend Michelle and I had also signed up to go to the International Justice Mission’s prayer gathering in DC.  It’s not really a banquet, and we’ve heard it is an awesome prayer-filled weekend.  IJM is also doing incredible work rescuing women from trafficking around the world.  We were excited to go, so we paid the registration and booked our hotel.  But after giving it some further thought, we backed out.  With the kids in sports, work, the general busyness of life, and preparations for our big trip to Cambodia in June, we decided it would be best to stay home.

So many great opportunities.  But life is just too busy to go to every banquet.

On Easter at Faith Church you’re going to hear about another banquet invitation.  Shouldn’t Easter focus on the resurrection?  Yes! We’ll talk about that too.  But you’re also going to hear about some people who, like me, are too busy to go to a banquet.  But this is a banquet invitation like no other.  It’s not a fundraiser.  It’s one you won’t want to miss. Will you be too busy?

At the turn of the new year, we skipped a section of our study through Luke, and I promised we would return to it on Easter.  So on Easter we jump back to a very interesting story of a banquet invitation in Luke 14:15-24.  Hope you can join us.

Open your mind to new life – Luke 24

8 Apr

New-Life-And-OldLast week I asked “Is there only bad news in a broken world?

This past Sunday I had some help from the elementary age kids (and some of you older “kids”!) in trying to answer that question.  Becka, our worship leader, drew large a large picture of planet earth, and as I mentioned the bad news out there in the world today, I ripped up the globe into pieces.  It can feel like ours is a shredded world.  I talked about how the disciples following Jesus just had their world ripped to pieces.  Their leader had been arrested, beaten, falsely tried, and killed.  They could easily be next!  So I handed out the ripped pieces of the world, and asked the kids to color them brightly, and I continued with the story.

On the third day those same distraught disciples started hearing very strange news.  Good news.  But so good it was unbelievable.  They heard their Lord was alive!  As the days wears on, their excitement builds as he shows up to meet with a few of them.   Finally, he appears at the place where they were all together.  After getting over their initial shock, he gets down to the business of sorting this all out for them.

You can read about it in Luke 24:44-49. You can see their lights going on, or as Luke says in verse 45, “he opened their minds,” so they could understand that the Scriptures they had heard all their lives going to worship at synagogue now found fulfillment in him. He was the promised Savior, the Messiah. But he was a very different Savior than what they expected. The prevailing idea of the day was of a military Messiah who would remove the Romans from their land.

Jesus wasn’t a king with a sword on a warhorse. Instead, he was the one who would save the world from the penalty of sin. Forgiveness is possible. Repentance is possible. New life is possible. Just as he rose from the dead to new life, so they and you and I can have new life. As he taught them many times, it was not just a promise of eternal life in heaven with him after death. Life after death is good news! It was certainly that. But it was not just that. He also offers to us the possibility of abundant life now.

We Christians often sit back and shake our fingers, saying “What is wrong with the world today?”

The great writer G. K. Chesterton was reading the paper once and came to the editorial section. The editors of the paper asked readers to answer that very question. “What is wrong with the world today?” He knew he needed to respond. So he wrote a letter to the editor. Probably the shortest letter in the history of letters to the editor: “What is wrong with the world?” Chesterton’s response was two words: “I am.”

As long as we just sit back and talk, we are what is wrong with the world. New life means we are changed, and we share that victory with the world.  We are to be the good news in the world. New life in Christ starts by changing our hearts, and then we share that new life in as many ways possible.

As we were talking about this passage a few weeks ago at our sermon roundtable Bible study, one person told the story about a woman who was driving behind him way too close in a big old car. And he got angry. He thought, if she stops, I’m going to give her a piece of my mind. And then he thought “I don’t want to live like that…so angry.” He said that he needs that hope, that awareness of what Jesus has done for me.  When we remember that our sins are forgiven, we can and should repent of our sins and take on the new life of Christ.  Abundant life is a life that turns away from sin.

One of the first followers of Jesus who would come along a bit later, a guy named Paul, said in the letter he wrote to the church in the city of Ephesus that we are not alone in this abundant life.  Instead God wants to help us change.  Take a look:

I pray also that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, and his incomparably great power for us who believe. That power is like the working of his mighty strength, which he exerted in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly realms, far above all rule and authority, power and dominion, and every title that can be given, not only in the present age but also in the one to come.

Did you hear that? The same power that rose Jesus from the dead to new life is available to us! That is Good News. Jesus’ new life means there is hope for our lives to be made new!

He wants to make the world new. At that point in the sermon, the kids brought their newly colored ripped pieces of the world put the picture of the world back together.

In the same way, when you follow Jesus, know that he wants to make you new, to put your life back together.

Many of you know I really enjoy the band U2.   Their lead singer, Bono, was recently asked about Jesus and new life, and I like what he had to say:

Do you need some good news? The message of Easter is that new life is possible in Jesus. Your sins can be forgiven. Repent of your sin, believe in him, and ask God to give you his resurrection power to make your life new. That is good news. That is news worth searching for. God gave to give us an abundant life – not an easy life, not a cut and dry life – but an abundant life. Life to the fullest. Life lived in community with one another and with an all-loving, gracious, giving God. We have access to a New Life.

Our old history ends with the cross; our new history begins with the resurrection.
Watchman Nee

Is there only bad news and a broken world?

3 Apr

broken worldHearing the bad news coming out of Kenya these past few days has been a sobering reality about our world.  I know that there is tragedy and evil like that pretty much every day of every week, but this one hit home because we have close friends who are missionaries in Kenya, and my son and I are preparing to join a team of 15 from Faith Church going to Kenya this summer.

I’ll admit, probably because of our unprecedented access to every part of the globe, I can get jaded about the bad news.  How many times can you get totally upset over a mass shooting before you start to get numb?  We call it growing a thick skin.

Some people, rightly though, say that we shouldn’t be surprised by the evil and tragedy out there in the world today.  They say that it is a fallen world, and that bad news is part and parcel of a fallen world. I tend to agree, but, man, can that come across callous.

I am paying closer attention to the news in Kenya, and I’m feeling it more emotionally because it is personal.  Thankfully my friends in Kenya live in a different part of the country and are safe.  But so many in Kenya are struggling today, so many are experiencing profound loss with this very bad news.

And that feels completely contradictory to the task I have in this blog post.  My aim is to introduce an Easter sermon.

I would much rather be introducing an Easter sermon after hearing wonderful news about how Christians in the world did something incredible because of the hope they have in Jesus.  Instead today we are hearing about Christians who were killed for being Christians.

I suspect that my consternation over this introduction is at least in part stemming from my vantage point of Christianity as the largest of the world religions.  But the original Easter story happened to a group of people that were the furthest thing a world religion.

Let me explain with a new word I learned this week: Triduum.  Ever heard that before?  It refers to the three days leading up to a feast, in this case Easter.  The Holy Triduum, or the three days leading up to Easter are Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday.  As I was preparing for worship this week, it struck me how awful those three days must have been for those first followers of Jesus, and of course for Jesus too.

On Palm Sunday they are marching triumphantly into the city.  The crowds declare him King.  These are bold moves.  You don’t walk through the current king’s front door proclaiming that you are the new king, and you certainly don’t do it without a massive army.  Jesus came not riding on a warhorse, but on a peaceful donkey.

Who knows?  Maybe the Romans were laughing their heads off at that scene.  They probably didn’t feel threatened at all.  If they wanted to, they could have stopped the events of Palm Sunday immediately and ruthlessly.  Physically speaking they had no reason to be threatened by this supposed Jewish King.

Turns out it wasn’t the Romans, but the Jewish leaders who felt threatened.  They had been dogging Jesus for months and now things came to a head.  The joy and victory of Palm Sunday turned to a betrayal and arrest on the first day of the Triduum, Maundy Thursday.  Jesus’ disciple Peter whips out a sword to fight, thinking this is the moment. You gotta love Peter’s passion, making the first strike, cutting off a dude’s ear.  But when Jesus heals the guy, putting the ear back, you have to think that Peter was shell-shocked.

Hours later he denies Jesus three times.  All of Jesus’ 11 remaining inner circle run away, except John.  If Jesus was arrested, they were probably thinking, there could easily be a bounty on their heads too.

Jesus passes the night in a dungeon, and now we’re at day two of the Triduum, Good Friday.  He has been and still is being beaten repeatedly.  He is brought to trial on trumped up charges, and the politicians get involved.  They really don’t know what to do with him as he hasn’t actually done anything wrong, but the pesky Jewish leaders are calling for his death.  So the Roman leader Pilate gives Jesus another beating and sends him to be killed.

And they crucify him.

John alone, of all the disciples, and some of the women, are the only ones at the foot of the cross.  And Jesus dies.  Imagine that.  Three years of ministry.  In the toilet.  One of the Jewish establishment guys who is a secret follower of Jesus takes his body and buries it in a tomb.  He is given an honorable burial, but it sure seems like waste.  Could this one who was supposedly king material just be another in long line of failed upstart Jewish freedom fighters?

That takes us to the final day of the Triduum, Holy Saturday.  A day of waiting, confusion.  He had told them he would rise after three days.  I wonder what those disciples were thinking.  Did they have any idea what “rise after three days meant?”  I also wonder if they were ticked off at Peter.  I wonder if they even knew he had denied Jesus.  Did Peter tell them?  He wasn’t one to keep quiet.  I can hear them arguing, debating wondering what in the world they should do next.  Clearly they decided to stay in the city, maybe just because it was Passover and that’s  what you did.  Maybe they actually weren’t decided on what they should do.  Maybe they were too torn apart to know how to think.

Their world was broken.  The events of those three days had ripped it to shreds.  Our world can feel very broken like that.  Events of the past days leave us confused and frustrated, just like the disciples.

What do we do?

Is there no good news?

The Triduum will eventually finish.  And there will be a new day.  If you’re not part of church, we’d love for you to be our guest at Faith Church on that new day, this Sunday, Easter, as we search for some good news.

Resurrection NOW

23 Apr

resurrectionIn 2nd Corinthians 5:17, Paul writes to the Christians in the Roman city of Corinth: “If anyone is in Christ, he is new creation. The old has gone, the new has come.”  What he means is what I said in last week’s sermon intro post: we can be, and in fact we need to be, resurrected now, before we die.

On Easter Sunday, we looked at what Paul says in 1st Corinthians 15 about resurrection.  At the beginning Paul reminds them of the good news that he preached to them. Good News is often called gospel. That’s what “gospel” means? “Good News”.

The amazing good news is that there is no one that cannot be reached. There is resurrection hope for everyone…NOW!

But what is the scope of that resurrection hope?  Like I said last week, just pie in the sky when we die?  So often churches and Christians through ages have talked about the good news as salvation from hell.  No doubt that is good news!  Resurrection means we have hope of rising from the dead as Jesus did, so that we can be with him.  But what we see in the pages of the New Testament is that God is very much concerned about the situation of our lives NOW.

The shocking good news that the resurrection tells us is that we can begin to live the new life of Christ now.

The old has gone, the new has come.  The words are in in the present tense.  We can be changed NOW.

I think this is what is so powerful about the words that Paul shared in the verses that we studied a week ago. Remember what he said in 1st Corinthians 6:11?

After listing a bunch of vices, he says “that is what some of you were!”

You were changed.

Think about the junk of your life. God wants to lift you up out of that and help you experience his abundant life now.
This new abundant life gives us the idea of Jesus’ kingdom come now. Like he taught us to pray in the Lord’s prayer: Your kingdom come, your will be done, on EARTH as it is in heaven!

One way to understand this concept is to see that the resurrection so changes us that we make it our life’s passion to usher in the Kingdom now, in all its various forms.  This is why we as a church have given so much time and attention to the needs of our community. Serving the poor through CVCCS. We want them to understand that God’s Kingdom matters now, that resurrection is available now!  I love seeing the display in our building’s lobby, asking people to donate items for the food and clothing bank. I am so proud of Faith Church for having Church Has Left The Building Sundays where one Sunday per year, instead of having a worship service in our sanctuary, we the church leave the building and worship by serving the community. We want them to see that God’s Kingdom matters now, that resurrection is available now.

And so we need to be resurrected now. When we trust in Christ, when we believe in him as the savior of our sins, when we give our lives to follow him, he tells us that we are being made new, right now.  Do you need to be resurrected now? I’d love to talk with you.