Tag Archives: defeated

Can a mysterious Bible passage help those feeling defeated in life?

20 Aug

Photo by Ian Espinsoa on Unsplash

Are there any areas of life where you just feel defeated?  Work?  Parenting?  A relationship?  Finances? Health?

Think about the last few weeks or months.  How has it been?  Do you ever feel like the waters are rising up around you?  Like you are drowning?

Sometimes I think life can be a journey in managing disappointment.  Why is it that the bad times seem so much more powerful than the good?  When a good thing happens, we are joyful, but it can seem like we need 10 good things in a row in order to offset the pain and disappointment of just one bad occurrence.  Know what I mean?

I’ll give you a personal example:  I am about to start studying for my doctorate in our seminary’s new Doctor of Theology program, and specifically in the leadership track.  If I submit a research essay, even if I get an A on the paper, if the professor makes critiques, guess what I will be dwelling on?  The A?  The good comments?  Nope.  I will dwell on the places the professor thinks I could have done better.  Those will fill my mind.  Sometimes I can obsess about the negative to the point where even if I got a good grade, I feel like I failed.  Defeated.

Those feelings are a common life experience for just about all of us.  The pressures of life these days are high.  Maybe it is a bad review at work.  Maybe it is when your kids were disobedient and you feel like it must be your parenting fail.  I get it.  Maybe it was one of those weeks when multiple appliances, or cars, or computers, or stuff breaks all at the same time.  Do you feel defeated today?

How can followers of Jesus deal with feelings of defeat?  I think Peter tries to answer that question in our next section of 1 Peter.  1 Peter 3:18-22.  Before we look at Peter’s thoughts, I want to introduce this section.

Do you remember a few weeks ago when I mentioned the Apostle’s Creed?  That post talked about 1 Peter 3:8 where Peter says, “live in harmony with one another” and goes on to describe the unity that the church should have.  A foundational question is “to achieve unity, how much does a church family need to agree on, and is it okay to disagree?”

So we talked about this phrase “in essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.”  That phrase serves as a guide to help us think through how much we should agree on, and how to disagree.  It says that we should be unified on the essentials.  What are the essentials, though?  What are those teachings or doctrines or beliefs that we should be unified about?

I suggested that Christians from the very early years of the church rallied around a common creed called The Apostle’s Creed.  In this short statement we find the teaching of the apostles condensed into something that we believe Christians should find as essential.  And this is why many churches say the Creed every week.

In our Faith Church hymnals, The Apostle’s Creed is printed in a section with other creeds.

Right below the Apostles Creed we find the Nicene Creed.  It is also a very ancient creed. The general consensus is that the Apostles Creed is the oldest creed, and as time went by the leaders of the church wanted to clarify some things the creed said Christians believed.

Compare the Nicene Creed with the Apostles Creed, and the Nicene Creed is much longer.  There was a general church conference that took place in the year 325 AD in the city of Nicaea.  Christians leaders and thinkers from all over were invited to that conference, and they debated many different topics, eventually leading to the publication of the Nicene Creed.  The Nicene Creed is not only longer, but also different from the Apostles Creed.

It is one of those changes that I want to point out.  The Nicene eliminates a phrase from the Apostle’s Creed: “he descended into Hades or hell”

Why would the Council at Nicaea want to get rid of that?

Consider what the Apostle’s Creed says: “Jesus was crucified, dead, and buried.”  We understand that.  Very common, well-established in the Gospel accounts.  But why does the Creed say next that he descended into hell?  Does it come from the Bible?

Now we can look at 1 Peter 3:18-22.  Please read that.

Now do you see why the Apostles Creed says “he descended into hell”?   No, yes, maybe.  Well, look at verse 18.

In tomorrow’s post we’re going to look more in-depth at verse 18, but for now I want you to simply see that this is a pretty standard description of Jesus’ death and resurrection.  It takes you back to Good Friday and Easter.  The story we tell every year.  Jesus was arrested, tried on false charges, convicted, beaten, and crucified.  There on the cross he died, they took his body down, and they buried him.

Three days later he miraculously rose again by the power of God, and he lives.  That’s verse 18.  In just a few words, Peter has reviewed the story that is foundational to Christianity. Jesus died for sins and rose again to bring us to God! Amazing!  This is good news!

But look at what he says in verses 19 and 20: he, Jesus, preached to the spirits in prison who disobeyed long ago in the days of Noah?

Do you know what Peter is talking about?

This is considered to be one of the most difficult passages in the entire New Testament.  There are many theories trying to explain Peter’s cryptic, mysterious words.  I thought about doing a survey of the three main theories, but instead I am going to take the advice of one of the scholars I read and focus on what I believe is the best way to understand Peter’s teaching.  I think you’ll find Peter’s words have wonderful encouragement for those who are feeling defeated.

Tomorrow we dive in.

Are you feeling defeated? There is hope!

3 Oct

how are you

It’s a simple question, “How are you?” with many forms:

“How’s it going?”

“How ya doin’?”

“How are things?”

These questions have become a pleasant formality, a nicety, rather than a serious question.

And the polite response is “Fine.”

Or “Good”.

The pleasantries complete, we move along having just completed our relational duty.

But we’re not fine.  Things are not good.  Behind the “fine” is another world.  Sure, some parts of our life are fine and good, but there are other parts also.  Do any of the words up there behind the “Fine.” describe your life?

How have you been feeling lately?  Defeated?  Maybe depressed?

Our current global situation doesn’t help matters much, does it?

  • Ebola
  • ISIS
  • Ukraine
  • Global Warming
  • Debt
  • Race Riots

The world doesn’t seem like a very welcoming place sometimes.  Where is the love, y’all?

But maybe your concerns are closer to home.  A broken relationship, mountains of bills, a struggle with a vice.

Do you feel defeated? Maybe not 100% all the time. But do you have moments where you feel somewhat defeated? Do those moments happen more often than you’d like?

Do you sense that something is not right?

In 1st Corinthians 15, Paul has walked the Corinthians through a methodical teaching about resurrection. There were some people who were teaching that resurrection was not possible. As we have seen over the last three weeks, if resurrection is not possible, then Christian faith is meaningless.   But Paul affirms in many ways that resurrection is not only vital, but also that Jesus’ resurrection really did happen. Furthermore, he says that one day we too will be resurrected to new life.

Paul says the resurrection matters. But does it matter just after death?

Or might it also matter now? Maybe it should matter now?  How could it matter to us, people who sometimes struggle in this life, people who long for that new resurrection life now?

This week we look at 1st Corinthians 15:51-57 as we hear what Paul has to say about this.  We hope you’ll considering joining us at Faith Church on Sunday!  There is hope for those of who are not feeling fine!