Tag Archives: women

Can women be leaders in the church? Titus 1:5-9, Part 3

19 Jun
Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Can women be leaders in the church? What is your church’s position on this? After establishing blamelessness as the baseline requirement for church leaders, Paul goes on to describe how blameless church leaders handle their lives in Titus 1:6-7. Blameless leaders will have demonstrated four things:

  1. Be a husband
  2. Of one wife
  3. Have faithful children who also cannot be accused of rebellion.
  4. See themselves as God’s stewards.

In parts 3 and 4 of this week’s posts, we’re going to look at each of these four statements.

First he says that blameless leaders are husbands.  The emphasis here is on the male aspect, not so much on the married part.  Paul himself was single, and it is okay for single people to be leaders.  But what about that male emphasis?  So many people through the ages have said, “See, only men can be leaders of the church, as Paul is only talking to the husbands.”  At Faith Church we understand this principle a bit differently.

We believe that Paul was speaking to the cultural situation of his day.  The surrounding culture of the Roman Empire was so thoroughly patriarchal, that Paul argues for male leadership in the church.  Paul also taught that men and women are totally equal in God’s eyes, so he could be accused of being contradictory. I don’t think he is.  Here’s why.

I think the question we should be asking is why he had to bring this issue up so much.  Did you ever think about that?  Paul mentions gender roles in the church repeatedly.  It comes up in 1 Corinthians 11, Ephesians 5, 1 Timothy 2, and here in Titus.  In such a deeply patriarchal culture you wouldn’t think this should be an issue that Paul would need to talk about.  Why? Everyone in the Roman Empire assumed that men would be leaders.  It’s just the way it was in a patriarchal culture.  Why then does Paul bring it up so often with these Christians?

He has to refer to gender roles so often because of what he already taught them.  Paul was bringing a new radical teaching to their society, that there is new life in Christ, that Jesus had ushered God’s Kingdom into the world, a kingdom where men and women were equal in God’s eyes.  In fact, read Galatians 3, and Paul concludes that in Christ Jesus there is no male or female, but all are one.  In God’s Kingdom there is no patriarchy.  That was earth-shattering stuff for those Greeks and Romans.  The women, of course, embraced it.  It was empowering for them, as it should have been.  There are indications in Paul’s writing that the women were grabbing hold of this new teaching and owning it, to the point of breaking cultural norms like cutting their hair, speaking in public, and so on.  And why not?  God’s Kingdom had come to town and it was a new day. 

Except for one really important matter. The rest of the culture wasn’t buying this new message. Paul knew, to preserve what was being built and being taught, to preserve the church, that these Cretan Christians had to be careful to not lose the main goal and point, which was the mission of God’s Kingdom.  His heart was to establish the church so deeply, that in time it could be an influencer of culture, viably creating a society that reflected Kingdom values of oneness and equality between gender. At this early stage, though, the church was far from ready for that. To preserve that mission, then, Paul taught them that it was going to have to male leadership only. 

But what about a different culture, one that didn’t have patriarchy, a culture where men and women are equal?  Can you think of any cultures trying to be like that?  Any cultures where men and women have equal access and opportunity?  Any culture where the women’s national soccer team, for example, scored more goals in one World Cup game than then men’s soccer team scored in all their games in the previous four World Cups combined?  I think I know a place like that.  In a place like that, we believe that Paul would have taught equality in gender roles in the church.  Because we live in one of those cultures where men and women are equal, we believe it is most faithful have gender equality on our leadership team.

I have great respect for Christians who disagree with our approach. Some of them are pastors in my own denomination. Many biblical scholars and theologians have undertaken projects to provide a rationale for male headship in the church and family. Those scholars have done due diligence, and I understand from Scripture why they disagree with the approach I describe above. I hope we can graciously agree to disagree. I will admit that I do not know for certain if my viewpoint is correct. Of course I think it is correct, but I could very well be wrong.

Why I’m preaching 3 different sermons about modesty…at the same time…kinda…

25 Feb

Image result for sermon on modesty

Tomorrow I’m preaching 3 different sermons on modesty…at the same time.  Kinda.  Obviously, I can’t speak three sermon simultaneously, unless I recorded them separately and played them all at the same time.  Or maybe I could record two, playing them at the same time as I preach the third.  Imagine the cacophony.

Instead, I’m planning on speaking three sermons on modesty within the same timeframe of 30-35 minutes.  Don’t worry, Faith Church, tomorrow is a coffee break Sunday, so that means coffee and snacks come before the sermon!  You might want to bring extra with you back to your seats.

Actually, the first two sermons on modesty will be rather short.  In fact, I can summarize each of them in one paragraph for you.  Before I do that, though, you might be wondering why I am preaching on modesty at all.  Simply, it is what comes next.  I have been preaching through the biblical book of 1st Timothy, which is actually a letter that the Apostle Paul wrote, around 60AD, to his young associate named Timothy, who was pastor of the church Paul started in the Roman city of Ephesus.  Paul wanted the church to thrive, and he wanted Timothy to thrive as its pastor.  He writes Timothy, then, giving him advice and instruction about numerous matters in the church.

Last week we started chapter 2 in the letter, and we found that chapter 2 includes instructions about worship.  First up was prayer, and Paul talked with the men about raising hands in prayer.  You can read about that here and here.  This week he speaks to the women, instructing them how to dress modestly. That’s why we’re talking about it.  You can see what Paul says in 1 Timothy 2:9-15.

I’ve been thinking about this sermon quite a lot this week, and I’ve decided it is going to require three sermons in one.

The first sermon on modesty is the one that some men have asked me to preach to the ladies.  Here’s a summary:

Dear sisters in Christ, we battle lust in our hypersexualized culture.  It is hard.  We get weary. The last thing we want is to see some of you dressed immodestly.  So help a guy out. Please cover up.

And now for my second sermon on modesty.  This is the one that some ladies have asked me to preach to the men.

Dear brothers in Christ, we are ogled at in our hypersexualized culture.  It is hard.  We get weary.  The last thing we want is to have you checking us out.  So help a girl out. Please look up.

But you know what?  I really don’t want to preach either of those sermons.  There is certainly truth in both of them.  And that’s why I’m still going to preach them.  But I have a third sermon on modesty as well.  It is the one I really want to preach  That one you’ll have to come to Faith Church tomorrow February 26, 2017, if you would like to hear it.  I hope you can join us!  Then stay for sermon discussion group, where we can talk further.

PS – There might even be a bonus 4th sermon.