Tag Archives: tithing

God cares about cross-dressing and fallen bird’s nests? [Should Christians Observe the Old Testament Law – Deuteronomy 21-25, part 1]

28 Jan
Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

I wonder how many women reading this post are wearing some form of pants? Actually, what I should do is ask, how many of you are wearing clothing that is traditionally women’s clothing?  Some form of dress or skirt?

All of you wearing shorts, pants or jeans, why did you choose something so detestable?  You think I’m joking?  You’re not sure if I’m being serious. 

In Deuteronomy 22:5 we read very clearly that “a woman must not wear men’s clothing.”  Now it also says “nor a man wear women’s clothing.”  So men, are there any of you wearing women’s clothing?  If so, it seems that would be detestable too.

If this is true, then why do so many Christian women disobey this teaching?

Before we answer that, let’s keep reading more laws in Deuteronomy 22.

Look at verses 6-7, and God seems to have an interest in fallen bird’s nests.  If a nest falls from a tree, he says, you can take the young birds as your possession, but not the mother.  What could that be about?

And then in verse 8, he jumps to parapets around roofs.  You must build parapets on your roofs.  Reader, do you have a parapet on your roof? No…Neither do I. Are we disobeying God?

Then in verse 9, God commands them against planting two kinds of seed in one vineyard…not good…that will defile the fruit.  Again, what is God thinking here?

How about verse 10, any of you ever had to do plowing with animals?  Maybe some?  Well, take note…don’t plow with an ox and donkey yoked together. 

Verse 11, now check the tags on your clothing…any made with wool and linen mixed together?  Or in verse 12, any of you have tassels on the four corners of your cloak?  No???  Why not?

So many rules, and such a wide variety!

What do we do with these laws?  We’ve been studying the biblical book of Deuteronomy at Faith Church, and we’ve come to a section of the book, basically chapters 21-25, that lists a whole bunch of seemingly random laws. 

If you’ve read this blog for a year or two, you have most likely heard me talk about one of my seminary professors, Dr. Dave Dorsey.  He was a beloved, long-time professor of Old Testament at Evangelical Seminary in Myerstown, PA.  There were many things I learned from Dr. Dorsey, but perhaps the one that I go back to time and time again is related to these laws in the Old Testament.  If I were to guess, this comes every couple months at Faith Church somehow or another.  What I am referring to is Dr. Dorsey’s four-step method for describing how Christians can interact with the Old Testament Law. 

There are plenty of these of these laws that come up in our day and age, even though we are 3000+ years removed from them.  Above I listed some bizarre laws, but there are also familiar ones too, and we Christians can have strong opinions about them.

Jump over to chapter 23:19-20 – charge no interest.  We hear Christians talk about this as if Christians are bound to follow this.  I’ve encountered people appalled that Christians would charge interest of their brothers or sisters in Christ in their church family, as if the person who is charging interest is some greedy, abominable sinner.  Are they? 

But what about the Sabbath?  The idea of not working on the Sabbath.  That’s in the OT law. Shouldn’t we keep the Sabbath?

What about tithing?  The idea of giving ten percent. 

What about tattoos?  What about eating shellfish?  Pork?  On and on we could go.  Are Christians supposed to follows these laws?  Why do Christians follow some and not others?  What we are going to see in this series of post is that Dr. Dorsey’s four-part method helps Christians understand every law in the Old Testament.  Check back in for part 2 where we’ll get started!

Do you feel you’re being asked to give too much, too often?

12 May

How many of you are living paycheck to paycheck?

What do I mean by “paycheck to paycheck”?  What I mean is that you need that paycheck to keep coming in order to pay your bills.  If you don’t get that paycheck, you won’t be able to pay bills, buy groceries, etc.  Does that describe your family?  If so, your answer is “Yes” to that question.

But if you have enough savings where you can live for at least a month or more without any income, without working, without unemployment, then you would answer “no” that you are not living paycheck to paycheck.

My intent is not to shame anyone.  I know in our society there is a goal, a dream, that we should build up savings accounts and become financially independent.  But the reality is that for many of us finances can be such a struggle.

Those of you who are younger families, life is expensive with all the sports, and lots of bills, school loans, groceries, health insurance, car loans, rent or mortgages, and credit cards.

If you are an older family you might have a fixed income, lots of health bills, and life might be expensive for you too.

The reality is that we live in an amazingly prosperous society, but most people don’t feel prosperous.  Instead, for most of us, finances stress us out.  Do finances stress you out?  My hand is raised for that one.  I hate money.  I work hard to earn it, and it seems like it is gone just as fast as it comes in.

You know what that means?  When money feels tight, it is hard to be generous.

Not to mention how many people and organizations are asking for money: the sports booster club, the fire company, the fraternal order of police, the politicians, the non-profits like the Boy Scouts and local social services organizations.

And then there is the church asking you to give to mission trips, fundraisers, missionaries, the weekly regular offering, and more.

Let’s just admit it.  We churches ask a lot.  Last week at Faith Church it struck me that on one weekend we asked our church family to bring donations for the youth group Chicken BBQ, then to purchase Chicken BBQ, then to give a regular offering on Sunday morning, then to give over and above offering to the Capital campaign, and then at the end of the worship service, we asked yet again, when took up our monthly special offering for missionaries.

Frankly, as I read this, it’s embarrassing.  Essentially, last weekend we asked the family of Faith Church to give to five different needs. I’m tired of fundraising.  Are you?

We live in a day and age where so much is asked of us.  We are tired of all the requests.  We wish we could give more, and we feel guilty that we can’t.  Have you felt like that?  It is called donor fatigue, and it is real.  Has donor fatigue crept into your heart and mind?

This Sunday we finish our study through 1st Timothy, looking at what Paul says in 1 Timothy 6:17-21.  He has some important words to say to those of us experiencing donor fatigue.  We invite you to join us at Faith Church this Sunday May 14, 2017 as we are going to talk about how we should view generosity in a world where finances are a struggle and many of us have a bad case of donor fatigue.